Thursday, 13 November 2014

Updates

Okay, just some updates.

So I received a letter from Hospital Serdang regarding the salary that they still banked in even after I quit, for a total of 6 months, which sums up to RM26k. No I'm not missing a dot. That's RM 26,000. And I have to pay it back of course.

I've called the finance/account department of Hospital Serdang, and they explained a few things:
-If I still work with the government, the amount I owe them will be deducted from my monthly salary. Based on my friend's experience, it won't be like 10% or 20% of your salary. It will be EVERY SINGLE CENT from your monthly salary until the debt is settled. Unless,
-I write a letter to appeal and request for payment in installments. The max limit given is 18 months. However this is for government servants only. He's not so sure about those who are no longer working with the government.

I've sent an appeal letter, but I've yet to receive a reply. I'll update you guys when I have more info.

Protip: Don't spend the money that don't belong to you.

===================================================================

So how about my life, some of you may wonder. Well, after more than 2 years of leaving housemanship, I can say that there is NOT a single day I regretted quitting my housemanship, regardless of all the things that has happened.

I'm still working as an underwriter. Probably planning to jump ship sometime next year, to another company, 'cos the working environment here sucks.
I'm coping with my job well. Not excellent, but I think I'm doing a pretty good job, although the higher ups probably don't see me doing that much. I don't give a fuck. If you can't appreciate my job, I'm gonna find someone else who will.
Salary is okay. My car is 800 monthly, rent is 260 monthly. End of the month I can save up around 200-300. Not much I know. I spent a lot on shopping.
Work finishes around 5-6pm. So I have plenty of time for dinner, and hanging out, and getting a good night's rest.

If I were to rate my life now, on a scale of 0 to 10, with 10 being living the dream, and 0 being a houseman, right now I'm probably at 6-7. So yeah, not too bad.
Aything else you might be wondering, feel free to ask.

==================================================================

Some of you guys have enquiries, either via blog comments or e-mails, which I still haven't replied. If I don't reply within a week, then it's because I don't know the answer. I'll leave those to someone else who might know the answers.

Saturday, 9 November 2013

Attention to all parents!

Just sharing some news:

1. A medical student from Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), identified as 21-year-old Alvern Loo, committed suicide after failing to get consent from his parents to switch to another course. 
2. He wrapped his head with a white plastic bag and hanged himself with a belt at his parents' bedroom. It was believed that he took the opportunity to kill himself when his parents were not at home.
3. Oriental Daily understands that Alvern's father is the assistant principal of SMK Chung Hwa, Kuala Pilah while his mother is a teacher attached to SMK Tuanku Muhammad. 
4. Alvern's father told Oriental Daily that Alvern is the eldest son in the family and has a bright future.
5. The parents had initially disagreed with Alvern's decision to change to another course, but backed down few days after. 
6. The depressed father explained that he was upset at first because his son had studied MBBS for 3 years, so he had wanted him to persevere. He didn't expect Alvern to end his life as he had already given a green light to Alvern thereafter. 
7. When Alvern's mother chanced upon the dead body in her bedroom, she broke down in tears and hugged the body tight. 
8. Kuala Pilah OCPD Supt Azmi Abdul Rahim said the case has been classified as sudden death.

Source

So parents, please think carefully before forcing your child to take up something he doesn't want to. What you think might be best for him, might end up being the worst. R.I.P. Alvern Loo.

Friday, 21 December 2012

Should You Quit?

Okay, let's get straight to the point, since I'm not good with lengthy opening statements. Plus, no one ever reads them anyway.

Here's the deal. Since I started writing this depressing blog, I received quite a lot of e-mails, comments, messages, and phone calls from fellow housemans, all asking me this question: Should I quit?

Come on guys, I'm a nobody. You shouldn't quit just because some random guy on the internet told you to.
What're you gonna tell your parents?
"Mom, there's this one guy on the internet with a picture of a cartoon unicorn as his avatar, and he said that I should quit my housemanship."
Taking advice from a 25 year old guy who still watches My Little Ponies (awesome show by the way) might not be the best idea.

Listen, I didn't write this blog because I want to encourage HOs to quit. That was never my intention.

I wrote this blog so that I could share with HOs who want to quit, but are afraid to do so for various reasons, that quitting is not the end of the world, and that there are alternatives.

If your heart really wants you to quit, but you're afraid to do so out of fear of job insecurity, parents' objection, financial issues, etc, then this is where I hope my blog would serve its purpose as a platform to share our experiences, our decisions, and our dreams.

But if you wanted to do medicine yet you feel like quitting just because you can't stand the long working hours, the tough job, the scoldings, then no, you shouldn't quit just because of that. Other jobs are tough too. Just because housemanship is shitty, doesn't mean other jobs out there are like a bed of roses. Being an underwriter might not be as shitty as being a HO, but it's still shitty nevertheless.

Final word is, the decision to quit or not to quit, that's all up to you. Ask yourself, why do you want to quit.

If you already decided that you want to quit, but you don't know how, and what can you do after you quit, then this is where I hope I can help you guys with whatever bits of experience I have.

Tuesday, 11 September 2012

Underwriter Q&A

Hi guys,

This post would hopefully address some of the common questions that I get from housemans (in plural form, is it housemans? or housemen?) in regards to what being an underwriter is all about.

Please take note that I'm just entering my second week of training as an underwriter, so I might not be giving you the most accurate description regarding the job as an underwriter. Nevertheless, I'll see what I can do. Here goes.

Question 1: What is an underwriter? Is it like an undertaker? (common lame jokes that I often get, hardy har har)

Answer: No, an underwriter is not an undertaker. There are a few types of underwriting, which includes medical underwriting, financial underwriting, etc. But the one you should be concerned about is medical underwriting since you have a medical education background. Do note that the underwriting categories usually overlaps, so even a medical underwriting case would have some financial aspects that need to be taken care of, although you don't have to worry too much about this.
Underwriting is basically going through a client's personal and medical details, so that you can decide whether you should approve his insurance application, decline it, or perhaps approve it but at a higher premium.

Example:
Encik Ali would like to apply for an insurance plan. He filled up a few forms containing his personal info and his health background. He submitted these forms to his agent, and subsequently the case will be passed to you for you to decide whether to approve or decline his application.
So your job is to go through the relevant documents, which includes details of the insurance plan that he is planning to purchase, his health background, his personal details, and so on. A few scenarios are possible:

Scenario A) If his forms are correctly filled, and he has no major medical problems, perhaps just a simple appendicectomy 10 years ago and now he's fully recovered, then you can just approve the application.

Scenario B) Let's say he declares that he has hypertension, then you might want to impose a higher premium for him, since he is at more risk to develop hypertensive complications in the future. It's only fair. You might also want to request for a medical checkup at one of the panel clinics, to see if he already has any complications from hypertension, and how is his current blood pressure control. If a medical checkup seems insufficient, then you can request for a medical report from the doctor who's been attending to him.

Scenario C) Perhaps he might declare that he already has hypertension for 20 years, and that his kidneys are failing, and he is also under cardiology folllow-up for a heart problem. Then in this case, you might want to decline his application altogether since it is very likely that he will make a claim in the near future.

Although it might seem cruel to reject Encik Ali's application, it's what you have to do to keep the company running. If you're going to approve everyone's application and then everyone starts making claims, then who's gonna pay them once the company runs out of money? This is an insurance company mind you, not Bank Negara. Sorry Encik Ali.

Question 2: How much salary should I expect?

Answer: Somewhere between RM2300-3000, depending on the company, and your degree and experience. Experienced underwriters might get around RM3500. This will further increase once you have gained more experience and you gain the authority to handle more complex cases.

Question 3: What's the job like?

Answer: Come to work at 8.30am, switch on your computer, and start doing the cases until you finish at 5.30pm. Expect some back pain at the end of the day. On average you would be handling 20-35 cases per day. At the end of the month, there will be tons of cases, and you might need to stay back until 9 or 10pm. You might need to work on Saturdays as well.  But you can claim your overtime.

My job is a bit different though, since I'm just a part-time underwriter. They hired me because they wanted someone with a medical background to train new underwriters on the medical aspect of underwriting, as well as someone to liaise (that's hard to spell) with the panel clinics. So I'm not doing full-time underwriting.

In terms of working environment, it's awfully silent here. Just the sound of keyboards going 'clack, clack, clack'. It's like being in a library... with keyboards. No one seems to be chatting casually, even during lunch time. But perhaps other companies are different.

Question 4: How do I apply?

Answer: Browse through insurance companies websites, and look under the "Careers" or "Join Us" tab. Sometimes they have an online job application form, but sometimes you have to e-mail them. If you have to e-mail them, provide a nice cover letter.
Other sites: JobStreet, JobsDB, JobsCentral, etc. Just type "underwriter" or "underwriting" in the search box.

Question 5: Wow, thanks for all the info man! Can I treat you to a nice dinner tonight?

Answer: Yes. Yes you can. I'm a bit short on cash. Naah, just kidding. I'll survive.

Saturday, 4 August 2012

Looking for a job?

I took up the offer with the insurance company, and I've just handed in my 1-month resignation notice last week. I've asked my current boss, and he said that since I'm leaving, they'll need to recruit someone else to replace me. So to my fellow ex-housemans out there, here's your chance.

If you:
-are still struggling to find a job after quitting housemanship
-love doing sales (most important)
-love to meet new people (doctors, specialists, and clinic managers)
-love challenges
-are greedy
-are able to work as a team, as well as independently
-have a car and are willing to travel
-have the confidence to promote your product and convince doctors to buy them
-are good at doing demos and presentation
-have persuasive powers
-have experience working with a clinical software to manage patients in your hospital
-are good with basic computer skills (Word, Excel and PowerPoint at the very least)
-having a laptop would be an advantage

Then you might be the right person to replace me.
A few things though,
-your salary is lower than a houseman's salary (not including commissions).
-this product is hard to sell. Your competitors are like Toyota; cheap and easy to sell. You are like BMW; premium but expensive, and hard to sell.
-you're expected to go to 30 clinics per week, and close 6-8 deals per month.
-what you're selling is basically a software to manage GPs and Medical Centres, and the software covers both patient management, as well as the administrative tasks such as billing, invoicing, appointments, etc.

If you think you're up for the job, then bookmark this page first.
Don't start e-mailing me yet though. I'll need to confirm with my new sales director if it's okay for me to give you guys his e-mail so that you can send in your resumes to him.
If he gives the green light, then I'll update this post sometime next week.

**Update: The sales director has given me the permission to give you guys his e-mail so that you can send in your resumes to him. Those interested, kindly e-mail me at danny.sp87@gmail.com, and I will pass his e-mail to you. If any of you have gotten the job, then please update me through e-mail or through the comments form below. Good luck guys!

***I heard they already hired a new product specialist to replace me. So I guess the position is closed.

Tuesday, 17 July 2012

FAQ



Recently, I've gotten quite a number of phone calls, SMS, and replies in this blog (chewah, dah macam artis popular la pulak..) asking me questions such as "How to quit?", "What if I'm bonded by JPA?", "To whom should I send my resignation letter?", and other similar questions.

I've actually written a blog post on how to quit here: How to Quit?
And questions regarding the JPA bond have already been answered by some of the kind visitors of this blog (many thanks to those who contributed).

But since people keep asking, I'll write a short FAQ here to answer some of the common questions from my dear fellow housemans. I don't know much to be honest, but I'll try to share as much as I can. Please take my words with a pinch of salt, as some of the things I mentioned are just what I heard from my colleagues.

Question 1: How do I quit?

I'll just take a few extracts from my previous blog post. Here are some of the ways that you can use to quit your job:

  1. Submit a 24-hour resignation notice (Notis peletakan jawatan) - the most bad-ass way to quit your job. But then you'll have to pay them one month's worth of your salary, which is around RM4000. And if you do quit, the next time you want to apply to become a houseman again for whatever reason I simply cannot imagine, they will hire you based on a contract basis. Meaning they can send you to wherever they want you to go (anywhere within Malaysia that is, duh), and they can terminate you any time if they're not satisfied with your performance. Don't ask me where to get the resignation form. If your hospital is using a computerized system, then the form might be somewhere in the shared network folders. If not, try asking the admin person who is in charge of the housemans. The form needs to be counter-signed by the Pengarah or Timbalan Pengarah. All you have to do is fill up the form and submit it to the admin. Don't worry about KKM, because the admin will handle that.
  2. Submit a 1-month resignation notice - with this option, you don't have to pay them a month's worth of salary, but then you have to work with them for another 1 month. If you can bear the daily scoldings and humiliations for another month, then this is the suitable choice. The contract basis applies just like option No.1 as well.
  3. Missing in action (Tidak hadir bertugas) - this is my current plan. According to the admin people of my hospital, if you don't show up for work, then they're just gonna stop paying you your salary. When you feel like working again, you can just show up for work, and then they'll start paying you again. You don't have to be rehired on a contract basis. But of course it won't look nice on your work record. And if you do show up for work again, they will have to take some "disciplinary actions" a.k.a tindakan tatatertib. I'm not sure what they exactly meant by "disciplinary actions", but unless your hospital has a medieval-style torture chamber in the basement, it's unlikely to be anything that you should be worried about.
Question 2: What if I'm bonded by JPA?

Okay, first things first, I am not bonded by JPA because I took PTPTN loan. In case of PTPTN, it's really easy, because you're not bonded or tied to any contract. All you have to do is make sure that you pay the monthly installments. And they're not that strict anyway, I've missed a few payments and no one sent me a letter or anything.
But what about JPA? Well, if you took up the JPA scholarship, then it's going to be one of the major factor that's stopping you from quitting your housemanship. Why? Because you're bonded to the government for 10 years if you're a JPA holder. I couldn't be bothered to call up JPA since I never took their scholarship, so I'll just share with you guys some of the things I've heard from colleagues/bloggers/forummers/rumors about the JPA bond:

  1. The fine that you have to pay is not RM250,000 like you might have heard a few years ago. One of my friend quit her housemanship and the fine is only RM160,000. Still a large sum, but much less than RM250,000. A Toyota Camry rather than a BMW 3-Series. But my friend studied locally, so I'm not sure if those who studied abroad have to pay the same amount, since the cost of our local degree is much cheaper than the ones from UK, etc.
  2. I've heard stories that you can pay in installments. I don't think it's true, because so far no one can confirm this, not even my friend who quit her housemanship.
  3. A blogger recently told me in her comment that the 10 year bond doesn't mean that you have to become a doctor for 10 years. It just means that you have to work with the government for 10 years, regardless of your profession. Good news if you don't mind the low salary. Try looking up the SPA website and see what sort of jobs are available for degree holders.
Question 3: What kind of jobs are there for people who quit housemanship like me?

Refer to this blogpost:


There. I've answered some of the common questions to the best of my knowledge. If there is anything that I didn't mention in the post above, then it means that I don't know the answer. As much as I'd like to help my fellow HOs, sometimes I'm just as clueless as you are on certain matters.

Friday, 13 July 2012

New Dilemma


Recently, I got an e-mail from an insurance company, wanting to arrange an interview for the position of a medical underwriter. In the e-mail, they mentioned that the salary would be lower than a houseman's salary, so I think it should be around RM2500-3000. They still haven't called me for the interview, but in the e-mail, it sounds like they're very much interested to hire me. Haha, I'm not boasting or being overconfident here, but that's just what I honestly felt.

Anyway, assuming they are going to call me for the interview, and assuming I'm gonna get the job, I will be faced with two choices. Option A - Stay with my current company. Option B - Take up the new job offer and leave my current company.

As much as I'd like to do an administrative job, the insurance company is offering me a lower salary than my current salary. With my current company, I'm getting RM3500 per month, and that's not including the commissions. But with the insurance company, I'm probably gonna get something between RM2500-3000, and there are no commissions.

And I would feel kinda guilty to leave my current company, after they have trained me and started paying my salary even though I haven't even started selling anything yet. My colleagues are awesome, and my boss is just really really nice. Came in an hour late without any valid reason? He doesn't mind. Want to go back early? He'd say "Yeah, sure. No problem." without even asking why. Went for lunch at 12 noon and came back to office at 2.30pm? No one bothers. Colleague asks you whether picture A or picture B looks nicer for the brochure, pick any without even explaining why, and they'll say "Cool! Thanks for the help bro!"

Either everyone in this company is being ridiculously nice, or perhaps I'm just not used to not being scold every single day since I quit my housemanship.

But honestly, if the insurance company calls me up for an interview, and if I get the job, I'm gonna go with Option B.

**Update: The insurance company just called me up for an interview next week. Woohoo!!

***Another update: Insurance company is offering me RM2700 for the underwriting job. Hmm.. Do you guys think I should take up the offer?

Some info on underwriting: http://forum.lowyat.net/topic/296213/all